September 1, 2022


Update: September 13, 2022, 10:00 AM ET

  • 33 million people have now been affected by massive floods in Pakistan.
  • As of September 12, the number of fatalities has risen to roughly 1,400, according to Reuters.
  • Damages are now estimated at $30 billion.
  • The UN secretary general, António Guterres, attributed the disaster to climate change while visiting the devastated regions of Pakistan on Saturday, September 10. He stated that he has “never seen climate carnage” on such a scale and attributed the devastation to wealthier countries who
  • Attention has been drawn to the electricity station in the district of Dadu in the southern province of Sindh, one of the country’s worst affected areas, which supplies power to six provincial districts; government officials worry the floods will damage or destroy the 500kV station.
  • Pakistani troops have begun constructing dikes around the electricity station as preventative measures.
  • On Monday, September 12, a dust storm in Sehwan — which is also in the Sindh province — uprooted hundreds of tents pitched by people displaced or made homeless by the flood.
  • The Pakistan Meteorological Department predicts that heavy rainfall will continue over the next several days, exacerbating the threat of more flooding and destruction to the makeshift lodgings of people displaced or made homeless by the disasters.
August 31, 2022: flood-affected people taking refuge in a makeshift camp after heavy monsoon rains in Jaffarabad district of Balochistan province.
Photo by Fida HUSSAIN / AFP) (Photo by FIDA HUSSAIN/AFP via Getty Images)
September 12, 2022: A dust storm strikes Sehwan, a city located in Jamshoro District of Sindh province in Pakistan, destroying temporary lodgings and shelters constructed by people displaced or made homeless by the floods.
Image source: Press TV, Iran

Updated map analyses from CrisisReady shed light on the evolving displacement patterns as floods continue to devastate Pakistan. A new data layer has been added in the maps below to show the population change at administrative level 2, as the tile level population update has recently encountered issues.

In the latest population density maps, most areas, especially the populous cities in the Northeast part of Pakistan, have returned to pre-crisis levels. The flooded zones of the south still experience significant decreases in population densities. Population mobility trends show heavy movement out of areas surrounding Hyderabad and Karachi, and into more northern cities like Lahore, Multan, and Quetta.

Changes in population densities throughout Pakistan between September 10, 2022 and September 11, 2022.
Population movement patterns throughout Pakistan between September 9, 2022 and September 10, 2022.

Update: September 7, 2022, 2:50 PM ET

  • Over 95,000 square miles of Pakistan have been flooded, accounting for one-third of the country’s landmass.
  • As of September 7, 2022, the floods have now caused at least 1,343 deaths; 152 more than recorded cases of mortality six days ago.
  • Pakistani officials have stated that a little over a quarter of a million people are in shelters across the country.
  • The floods have destroyed over 1.2 million homes, CNBC reports.
  • Pakistan’s biggest lake, Manchar Lake, in the Sindh province is on the verge of overflowing. Three breaches have been made to the lake’s banks to protect surrounding areas; causing 100,000 people to be displaced.
September 5, 2022: People use a cot to salvage belongings from their flooded home, in Jaffarabad, Pakistan. 
Image Source: Fareed Khan/AP
September 6, 2022: Woman carries bins from her flooded home after monsoon rains, in the Qambar Shahdadkot district of Sindh Province, of Pakistan.
Image Source: AP/The Indian Express

CrisisReady has published an interactive map that shows population movement patterns driven by the floods between August 13, 2022 and September 5, 2022. Data reflecting population movement originated from selected level 2 administrative units of Pakistan, including Karachi, Larkana, Malakand, Quetta, and Sukkur.

The red arrows (shown below) on the map show the directional patterns of population movement. The size (width) of the arrows correlates with the the volume of individuals displaced from the selected origins. The larger the arrow, the greater number of movement vectors. Transparency of arrows indicates the baseline population traveling between the origin and the destination under the pre-crisis situation.

The maps were generated using data provided by Data for Good at Meta. For more information about the disaster population maps provided by Data for Good at Meta. Data on flood extent is gathered using the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), an instrument that collects visible and infrared images and global observations of the land, atmosphere, cryosphere, and oceans.


Update: September 1, 2022, 1:55 PM ET

Heavy rainfall in Southern Pakistan and melting glaciers in the country’s northern mountains have caused massive floods and flash floods that continue to devastate districts across the region. The floods have killed at least 1,191 people, of which 399 were children, since they began in mid-June at the beginning of monsoon season. In addition to this, a reported 3,554 individuals have been injured. The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) stated that as of August 29, 2022 more than 33 million people have been affected and more than 1 million houses have been destroyed.

Satellite image showing the region surrounding the Indus River at the same time last year, August 2021
Source: CNN World News
Satellite image showing a massive inland lake produced by the overflowed Indus River on August 28, 2022.
Source: CNN World News

The floods have spawned a critical humanitarian crisis as damage and displacement increases across the country. So far, 66 districts have been officially declared “calamity hit.” An estimated 50,000 people have been evacuated since rescue efforts began. Pakistan’s meteorological office has predicted that more flash floods are expected throughout September.

New maps showing population changes in the areas affected by the floods have been generated by CrisisReady and Direct Relief. The maps feature human mobility data collected between August 13 and August 30, 2022.

August 13 – August 14, 2022
Population Density Changes in Flooded Areas of Pakistan
August 15 – 16, 2022
Population Density Changes in Flooded Areas of Pakistan
August 17 – 18, 2022
Population Density Changes in Flooded Areas of Pakistan
August 19 – 20, 2022
Population Density Changes in Flooded Areas of Pakistan
August 21 – 22, 2022
Population Density Changes in Flooded Areas of Pakistan
August 23 – 24, 2022
Population Density Changes in Flooded Areas of Pakistan
August 25 – 26, 2022
Population Density Changes in Flooded Areas of Pakistan
August 27 – 28, 2022
Population Density Changes in Flooded Areas of Pakistan
August 29 – 30, 2022
Population Density Changes in Flooded Areas of Pakistan

Interpretation

The maps above show changes in population densities in areas affected by floods in Pakistan between August 13, 2022 — August 30, 2022. Population density changes were determined using mobility data from Meta’s Data for Good program. Percent changes were calculated based on the number of Facebook users in a specified area and during a specified time compared to pre-crisis baseline population densities.

Purple regions represent increasing population densities.
The maximum positive percent change shown on the maps is > 16.6
Regions that are more saturated represent greater percent increases from baseline values
Regions that are less saturated represent lower percent increases from baseline values

Red regions represent decreasing population densities.
The minimum positive percent change shown on the maps in < -18.2
Regions that are more saturated represent greater percent decreases from baseline values
Regions that are less saturated represent lower percent decreases from baseline values


Data Layers

Flood extent

Data on flood extent is gathered using the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), an instrument that collects visible and infrared images and global observations of the land, atmosphere, cryosphere, and oceans.

The suite is owned by the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Population Changes in Flooded Areas

These data show population changes compared to pre-crisis baseline in Pakistan on a daily basis for all level 3 administrative units of Pakistan. The data is time-enabled to show the change from August 13, 2022 to the latest date when population change data harvested by Data for Good at Meta is available.

Population maps provided by Data for Good at Meta are generated based on users of Facebook. For more information about the disaster population maps provided by Data for Good at Meta, please refer to this link.

Pakistan Level 3 Administrative Units

These data show the administrative boundaries of the third sub-national level in Pakistan.


Data Sources

  • Data for Good, Meta
  • GADM
  • United Nations Satellite Centre (UNOSAT)

Join Our Newsletter

Name(Required)